Our Power Supply

Sources of Power

Northern Nevada
Southern Nevada

NV Energy owns and operates power facilities that keep the lights on for over 2.4 million citizens throughout Nevada, as well as a state tourist population exceeding 40 million annually.

Find out more specific information about power supply in northern or southern Nevada by following the links above.

NV Energy-Owned Generating Resources

Southern Nevada: Where Does Your Power Come From?

NV Energy generates electricity at its own power plants in southern Nevada and augments its resources with renewable energy and other power supplies.. To improve its energy independence benefits, NV Energy has added about 1,800 megawatts of company-owned generation to its fleet in the past few years. These newer, more efficient plants use less fuel and water and produce lower emissions.

The company carefully schedules its plants and purchased power opportunities to keep costs to customers as low as possible.  There are times that the company purchases electricity at a lower cost than it can generate itself, and such savings are passed on to the customers on a dollar for dollar basis.

A growing amount of our energy comes from renewable sources and conservation, both of which are an important part of our energy supply strategy.

Southern Nevada Generating Stations

Chuck Lenzie Generating Station
Location: 30 miles North of Las Vegas, Nevada
Peak Generating Capacity: 1,102 Megawatts
Plant Description: The Chuck Lenzie Generating Station is a clean-burning natural gas-fueled power plant that is located north of Las Vegas. It is the largest combined-cycle generating plant in the NV Energy fleet.  The plant’s air-cooled condenser system saves millions of gallons of water annually and may be the largest such installation in North America.

Edward W. Clark Generating Station
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada
Peak Generating Capacity: 1,102 Megawatts
Plant Description: The Edward W. Clark Generating Station dates back to 1954 and included the oldest steam generated power plant in Nevada. Today, it is a multi-technology natural gas-fueled power generating complex that comprises a total of 19 generating units with in-service dates ranging from 1973 to 2008. One of the plant’s unique aspects is that it can help avoid purchasing high-cost energy, and it can support intermittent renewable energy by the use of 12 quick-start peaking units that can provide up to 600 megawatts of electricity in as short as 10 minutes start-up time.

Goodsprings Waste Heat Recovery Station
Location: Near Primm, Nevada
Peak Generating Capacity: 5 Megawatts 
Plant Description: Located near Goodsprings, Nev., this heat recovery project is owned by NV Energy, and currently operated by Ormat Technologies.  It is located adjacent to a Kern River Gas Transmission Company compressor station and captures heat from the compressors and then uses that heat to turn a separate generator to produce electricity. 

Navajo Generating Station

Location: East of Page, Arizona
NV Energy’s share of Generating Capacity: 255 Megawatts
Description: NV Energy owns 11.3 percent of the Navajo Generating Station, which is operated by SRP.  It is a coal-fueled facility that is jointly owned with the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, SRP, Los Angeles Dept. of Water and Power, Arizona Public Service Co. and Tucson Electric Power.  Its total capacity is 2,250 megawatts

Harry Allen Generating Station
Location: 30 miles North of Las Vegas, Nevada
Peak Generating Capacity: 628 Megawatts
Plant Description: The Harry Allen Generating Station is a clean-burning natural gas-fueled power plant that is located in southern Nevada, north of Las Vegas. It was originally built as a “simple cycle” plant to operate mostly during the hottest time of the year when customer demand was the highest. However, the plant expanded in 2011 to include two highly efficient General Electric 7FA+e combustion turbines and a recycled exhaust system to produce steam for a General Electric D11 steam turbine to make additional electricity. The plant is one of the most efficient and most environmentally clean plants in the nation. 

Reid Gardner Generating Station
Location: Near Moapa, Nevada
Peak Generating Capacity: 557 Megawatts
Plant Description: The Reid Gardner Generating Station is a coal-fueled, steam-electric generating plant with four operating units. The first two nearly identical generating units went into service in 1965 and 1968. A third similar unit was added in 1976. Each unit produces 100 megawatts with Foster Wheeler boilers and GE turbine-generators. The plant’s largest generating unit is a 257-megawatt unit that was commissioned in 1983 and uses a Foster Wheeler boiler to drive a Westinghouse turbine generator.  Even though the plant was initial built in the 1960s, it has undergone extensive technology improvements and is among the cleanest coal-burning facilities in the nation.

Silverhawk Generating Station
Location: 30 miles North of Las Vegas, Nevada
Peak Generating Capacity: 520 Megawatts
Plant Description: The Silverhawk Generating Station is a clean-burning natural gas-fueled power plant that is located in Southern Nevada north of Las Vegas. The plant utilizes two highly efficient Siemens / Westinghouse 501FD2 combustion turbines to produce electricity. Additionally, the exhaust from the two turbines is recycled to produce steam for a General Electric D-11 steam turbine to make additional electricity for NV Energy customers. The plant went into service in 2004. It is jointly owned with Southern Nevada Water Authority, but NV Energy is the operator and major owner (75 percent).

Walter M. Higgins Generating Station
Location: Primm, Nevada
Peak Generating Capacity: 530 Megawatts
Plant Description: The Walter M. Higgins Generating Station is a clean-burning natural gas-fueled power plant located in Southern Nevada near the California border. The plant utilizes two highly efficient Westinghouse 501FD combustion turbines to produce electricity. Additionally, the exhaust from the two turbines is recycled to produce steam for an Alstom STF30C steam turbine to make additional electricity for NV Energy customers. The plant went into service in 2004. Unlike conventional power plants that use substantial amounts of water for cooling, the Higgins Station uses a six story-high dry cooling system. Similar to a car radiator, 40 massive fans (34 feet in diameter) are used to condense the steam and cool plant equipment.

Northern Nevada: Where Does Your Power Come From?

NV Energy has enough company-owned power plants to serve nearly all the needs of northern Nevada most of the time. The company’s three generating stations have the capacity to produce over 1,500 megawatts of electricity.  (One megawatt is equivalent to the power required to serve about 600 households.)

The peak demand for power by the company’s 323,000 customers in 2011 was 1,513 megawatts. 

In order to hold down costs, NV Energy relies on a combination of power generated at company-owned plants and electricity purchased from other utilities and independent power producers, including several geothermal plants located in Nevada.

In 2011, the company generated 50.5 percent of the electricity for the company's customers in northern Nevada and purchased 49.5 percent. Much of the purchased power consisted of lower-cost hydroelectric power from the Pacific Northwest.

Of the electricity produced at company-owned plants in 2011, 36.9 percent was from the gas-fueled generating units at the Tracy and Fort Churchill power stations in western Nevada, and 13.6 percent was from the coal-fueled generating units at the Valmy Power Station in north-central Nevada.

NV Energy increased the company’s northern Nevada generating capacity by more than 50 percent in 2008 by constructing a highly efficient 541-megawatt gas-fueled generating plant at Tracy Station.    


Northern Nevada Generating Stations

Clark Mountain Combustions Turbines

Location: 17 miles east of Reno, Nevada
Peak Generating Capacity: 132 Megawatts
Description: The two Clark Mountain Peaking Units are part of the Frank A. Tracy Generating Station complex.  They are each 66 megawatt General Electric 7EA units that can burn either natural gas or diesel oil.

 

Fort Churchill Generating Station
Location: Yerington, Nevada
Peak Generating Capacity: 226 Megawatts
Plant Description: The Fort Churchill Generating Station is a clean-burning natural gas fueled power plant located in northern Nevada. The plant utilizes two Babcock and Wilcox boilers to produce high pressure steam to drive two General Electric turbine generators. The first 113 megawatt unit went into service in 1968, followed by the second unit in 1971. In the event of an interruption in natural gas service, this plant can switch to an on site fuel oil to provide temporary service to NV Energy customers.

Frank A.Tracy Generating Station
Location: 17 miles east of Reno, Nevada
Peak Generating Capacity: 1,021 Megawatts
Plant Description: The Frank A. Tracy Generating Station is a multi-technology natural gas-fueled power plant complex that includes a total of 12 generating units with in-service dates ranging from 1961 to 2008. The newest and largest addition consists of two highly efficient 7FA General Electric combustion turbine generators, similar to the turbines that power jet airplanes. The exhaust from these two units is then recycled to power a separate General Electric D-11 steam turbine for a combined maximum output of 578 megawatts.

North Valmy Generating Station
Location: Near Valmy, Nevada
Peak Generating Capacity: 522 MW
Plant Description: The North Valmy Generating Station is a coal-fueled, steam-electric generating plant with two operating units. The plant and complex are jointly owned (50/50) by NV Energy and Idaho Power. NV Energy is the operating company. Unit No. 1 went into service in 1981 and produces 254 megawatts with a Babcock & Wilcox Boiler and Westinghouse turbine/generator. Unit No. 2 went into service in 1985 and produces 268 megawatts with a Foster Wheeler Boiler and General Electric turbine/generator.